lesliegale:

The Honey Fest is now taking up a decent portion of my work life.   I think it’s going to be a wonderful event this year. For our portion on the 7th at Bartram’s Garden, we’re doing a honey-themed cooking contest for the first time, and I’m really excited about that.  It’s too bad I’m not eligible to compete!  I made rose flavored ice cream for a program earlier in the summer (it was good), and I would really like to experiment with rose, lavender, and honey ice cream!

Maybe I should anyway.  Just because.

I had a request for the rose ice cream recipe.

1 quart heavy cream

1 pint half and half

1 cup sugar

if you’re decadent, 1 vanilla bean split and scraped, all those tiny seeds will go in there

2 teaspoons vanilla extract, because those vanilla beans are expensive

2 teaspoons of rose water

Now at work, I use a hand cranked ice cream maker.  I mix all the ingredients into the metal can, put that in the bucket and fit the crank on top. Then I layer ice and rock salt (about a 1 quart jar’s worth) in the bucket.  It takes the average group of 20 eight year olds about 20 minutes to crank it into an ice cream-like consistency.  Those kids are usually very highly motivated.

If I experiment with honey, rose, and lavender, I promise I’ll give you that recipe, too!

The Honey Fest is now taking up a decent portion of my work life.   I think it’s going to be a wonderful event this year. For our portion on the 7th at Bartram’s Garden, we’re doing a honey-themed cooking contest for the first time, and I’m really excited about that.  It’s too bad I’m not eligible to compete!  I made rose flavored ice cream for a program earlier in the summer (it was good), and I would really like to experiment with rose, lavender, and honey ice cream!

Maybe I should anyway.  Just because.

Late summer profusion,  28 July 2014.  Another reason I love my job. Late summer profusion,  28 July 2014.  Another reason I love my job. Late summer profusion,  28 July 2014.  Another reason I love my job. Late summer profusion,  28 July 2014.  Another reason I love my job. Late summer profusion,  28 July 2014.  Another reason I love my job. Late summer profusion,  28 July 2014.  Another reason I love my job.

Late summer profusion, 28 July 2014. Another reason I love my job.

Franklinia completely budded out on 28 July, peak blooms in the next week or two? Franklinia completely budded out on 28 July, peak blooms in the next week or two? Franklinia completely budded out on 28 July, peak blooms in the next week or two?

Franklinia completely budded out on 28 July, peak blooms in the next week or two?

abeejourney:

Coming back a week (or so) after varroa treatment. I was worried for awhile. Now the current issue is yellow jackets! They fly around under the entrance and attack any wayward bee that miss the landing board. I’ve rescued a few by poking with a stick as they roll around attacking. But I guess it’s a bad idea to poke a yellow jacket with a stick.

Be careful! Yellow jackets can pack a nasty sting. I hope your hive recovers from the varroa.

science-junkie:

Why do honey bees dance? | At-Bristol Science Centre

Could you tell your friends where to find food just by dancing? Join Ross of the Live Science Team as he takes a look inside a hive to discover the mysterious behaviour of dancing honey bees.

eighteenthcenturyfiction:

arsvitaest:

Grasshopper

Author: Maria Sibylla Merian (German, 1647-1717)
Medium: Watercolor on paper

Location: The Courtauld Gallery, London

Gorgeous!

npr:

"Shifts In Habitat May Threaten Ruddy Shorebird’s Survival" via Elizabeth Shogren

The red knot flies 9,300 miles from South America to the Arctic and back each year. Now the bird faces threatened status on the endangered species list. It’s not its journey that could harm the bird –– it’s the changing climates along its route.

– Alexander

Image: Maggie Starbard/NPR

skunkbear:

nprglobalhealth:

How Protecting Wildlife Helps Stop Child Labor And Slavery

When scientists talk about the destruction of rain forests or the acidification of oceans, we often hear about the tragic loss of plants and animals.

But ecologists at the University of California, Berkeley, say there’s also a human tragedy that frequently goes unnoticed: As fish and fauna are wiped out, more children around the world are forced to work. And more people are forced into indentured servitude, scientists wrote Thursday in the journal Science.

"My students, postdocs and I spent a year stepping back and trying to connect the dots between wildlife decline and human exploitation," says ecologist Justin Brashares, who led the study. “We found about 50 examples around the world.”

One those examples made international headlines in June when the Guardianpublished a report about slavery in the Thai shrimping industry.

"Large numbers of men bought and sold like animals and held against their will on fishing boats off Thailand are integral to the production of prawns," the British newspaper reported. These shrimp are “sold in leading supermarkets around the world, including the top four global retailers: Walmart, Carrefour, Costco and Tesco,” the report said.

The world’s food supply, both here in the U.S. and abroad, is increasingly connected to child labor and human trafficking, Brashares says. And the problems isn’t just in the fishing industry or large supply chains that stock megagrocery stores. Many of the world’s poorest people are turning to exploitative labor practices to earn a living and feed their families as traditional sources of food disappear.

Wild animals, both on land and in the sea, provide incomes for about 15 percent of the world’s population, Brashares and his team wrote. These animals are also the main source of protein for many of these people.

Continue reading.

Photo: A child grabs sleep after a long day of labor in a struggling West African fishery. (Courtesy of Jessica Pociask, WANT Expeditions)

An important story.

kqedscience:

California’s Wandering Wolf Now Has Puppies in Oregon

New photos show that Oregon’s famous wandering wolf, OR-7, has at least three pups that he and a mate are raising in the Cascade Range of southern Oregon.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist John Stephenson said Friday that the photos taken July 12 by an automatic camera in a remote section of the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest show two gray pups.”

Learn more at KQED Science.